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Project Details

Project Inception meeting held from 11-15 May 2009 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia For a summary overview of the project please download our (project flyer).
Project Inception meeting held from 11-15 May 2009 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia For a summary overview of the project please download our (project flyer).
Who are we?

In 2009, Bioversity International launched a regionally coordinated project, ‘Conservation and Sustainable Use of Cultivated and Wild Tropical Fruit Diversity: Promoting Sustainable Livelihoods, Food Security and Ecosystem Services'. Our goal is to improve livelihoods and food security of target communities through the conservation and use of tropical fruit tree genetic resources.

How are we funded?

This project receives USD 3.6 million from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and is implemented through United National Environment Programme (UNEP). The 5 year project with a total budget of USD 10.3 million (about $6.7m as co-financing from partner countries and Bioversity) is executed by Bioversity International together with national research partners.  

Why are we needed?

* Cerbon in South Kalimantan represents two sites in this map i.e. Cerbon and Sungai Tabuk
* Cerbon in South Kalimantan represents two sites in this map i.e. Cerbon and Sungai Tabuk

India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand, the four project partner countries, are home to the project’s four species of tropical fruit trees: citrus, mango, rambutan and mangosteen. These tropical fruits are valued for their wide range of nutritional, health and use values that make them an important part of Asian culture. However, the genetic diversity of tropical fruit trees in Asia is increasingly threatened by several human-made reasons such as land use changes, habitat loss and climate change.

What do we do?

Through our key executing national partners: Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) in India, Indonesian Centre for Horticulture Research and Development (ICHORD) in Indonesia, Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI) in Malaysia and Department of Agriculture (DoA) in Thailand, the project seeks to strengthen the capacity of farmers by implementing community-based management of target fruit tree diversity in farms, and enhance the conservation of their wild relatives.

This will be achieved by documenting available diversity, identifying and promoting good practices while contributing to community livelihoods and building local, national and regional capacity to provide assistance in monitoring and policy support.

Impact Pathway
Impact Pathway

Kindly view the site map by visiting the link: https://maps.google.co.in/maps/ms?msid=214369556852953217892.00049798000cf458ac970&msa=0 


List of attached files
ID Name desc uploaded Size Downloads Actions
78 pdf TFT project_brochure.pdf Objectives and expected outputs 17 June, 2014 17:14 MYT by h.lamers@cgiar.org 192.07 Kb 470 View Download